Please adopt a witness

The MarineLives Summer Programme is underway. With the first week of transcription coming to a close, we  have fifty transcriptions under our belt, together with metadata for over three hundred manuscript pages.

Take a look at the following list of English Admiralty Court witnesses. They are described by name, occupation, residence, and in most cases their age, and are from folios 400r to 531r in the book of Court depositions covering the years 1659-1661 (HCA 13/73).

SNIPPET_SMALL_HCA_1368_MerhtsMarks_Horizt_Dividers_P1110234_f304_150812

If you click on the links you will go to our HCA 13/73 wiki, where you will find an image of the original manuscript page on which the witness appears.

In most cases you will find a space, waiting for our team to transcribe the image. For witnesses marked in blue you will see both an image and a transcription.

Then contact us, and tell us if there is a particular witness about whom you would like to learn more, and if you know something already about that witness, please share it.

____________________________________________________________________

ff.400r-409v

[WWW]Robert fframpton of Limehouse Shipwright late Carpenter of the ”Brazil ffrigot” (Thomas Heath Master) aged 35 yeares
[WWW]Phillip Manning of London Merchant aged 35 yeeres
[WWW]Daniel Boone of London merchant aged 23 yeeres
[WWW]Thomas Davies servant and Aprentice to Edward Thompson of Shadwell Dealemerchant aged 19 yeeres
[WWW]John Shawe of Tower wharfe Sailemaker aged 20 yeeres
[WWW]George Settle of Shadwell Cooper aged 25 yeeres
[WWW]Thomas Shute of Shadwell Brewer aged 20 yeeres
[WWW]Thomas Etheridge of Limehouse Ropemaker aged 38 yeeres
[WWW]Nicholas Pyburne Living in Schoolehouse Lane in Ratcliffe Ropemaker aged 22 yeeres
[WWW]Robert Hooker of Ratcliffe Ropemaker aged 38 yeeres
[WWW]Richard Hartshorne of Tower Wharfe sailemaker, aged Eighteene yeeres
[WWW]Thomas Severne of Lymehouse Mariner Masters Mate of the ship the ”John and Catherine” whereof John Miller was Master Aged 60 yeeres


MARKE_Hojar_Saracan_Armenian_Script_HCA1365_f.88r_300513

 ff.410r-419v

[WWW]Robert Scotting of Wapping Mariner aged 32 yeers
[WWW]Captaine William Jopp of Redriffe Mariner aged 45 yeeres
[WWW]Edmund Yorke of Redriffe aged 40 yeeres
[WWW]John Gibbs of Bermonsey in the County of Surry Marchant aged 50 yeeres
[WWW]William Bugbey of Lymehouse Mariner aged 49 yeeres
[WWW]Thomas Rastel of London Merchant aged 30 yeeres
[WWW]Thomas ffeild of harwich in Essex Shipwright aged 53 yeeres
[WWW]John Godfrey of Dover Court neere (XXX) Mariner aged 32 yeeres
[WWW]Thomas Cole of Acton neere Ispwich Mariner, Gunner of the ship the ”Mary Rose”
[WWW]John Turner of Ipswich shipwright Carpenter of the ship the ”Mary Rose”, aged 41 yeeres


 ff.420r-429v

[WWW]John Brand of Acton aged 44 yeeres
[WWW]Robert Marten of Acton neere Ipswich Mariner aged 51 yeeres
[WWW]William Howe of the parish of ffanchurch London mariner aged twenty fower yeeres
[WWW]George Whales of the parish of Saint Mary Magdalen Bermondsey Shipwright aged thirty yeeres
[WWW]Andrew Stone of the parish of Saint Olave in Southwarke mariner but borne at Stockholme in Sweden Carpenters mate of the ”Redd Rose” aged thirty fower yeares


CAPTURE_DETAIL_Marke_Oliver_Langdon_HCA1371_f455r_030113 ff.430r-439v

[WWW]John Johnson of the parish of Allhallowes Barking London Mariner aged twenty eight yeares
[WWW]John Triggs of the parish of Saint Mary Magdalen Bermondsey aged forty five yeares
[WWW]Phillip White of the parish of Saint Olave in Southwarke Mariner aged thirty three yeares
[WWW]Francis Hampton of Ratcliff. Shipwright aged about forty yeeres
[WWW]Richard Pigg of Cheeke (?Lane) near West Smithfeild (?Cooper) aged 29 yeeres
[WWW]Thomas Hulman Lieutenant of the ”ffairfax frigot”’ (Captaine Robert Story commander) aged 43 yeeres


 ff.440r-449v

[WWW]Captaine Robert Storey Commander of the ”ffairfax frigat” in the immediate service of this Commonwealth
[WWW]Captaine Willoughby Hanham commander of the ”kentish frigot” in the immediate service of this Commonwealth


HCA_13_64_Nofol_Elias_Beke_P1090604_CSG_170713

 ff.450r-459v

[WWW]Captaine John Stokes Admirall of the Squadron of shipps of this Commonwealth in the Mediterranean sea, aged 49 yeeres
[WWW]John van lynen master of the said shipp ”Saint XXXX” aged thirtie eight yeares
[WWW]John Moller of Amsterdam Merchant aged 28 yeares
[WWW]Ide Symonson Burch of Amsterdam Mariner master of the shipp the Marcus Aurelius of Amsterdam, aged 48 yeeres
[WWW]Jurian Houltho(?use) of Amsterdam Merchant, aged (?40) yeeres
[WWW]Abraham van(?ventur) of Amsterdam Merchant, aged 28 yeeres


 ff.460r-469v

[WWW]Rocus van der maes of (?Sizicksea) by birth but living in the hague in holland Merchant aged 37 yeeres
[WWW]John Wilkinson of Ipswich in the County of Essex Mariner, aged 44 yeeres
[WWW]William Hitchcock of Wapping in the County of Middlesex aged 60 yeares
[WWW]Henry Hare of Shadwell waterman aged 41 yeeres
[WWW]Ide Symonson Burch of Amsterdam mariner Master of the said shipp aged 48 yeeres
[WWW]Abraham van Dentur of Amsterdam Marchant, aged 28 yeeres
[WWW]Rocus Maes of Ziricksea but dwelling in the hague in holland Merchant, aged 37 yeeres


 ff.470r-479v

[WWW]Francis Holt of Portsmouth gentleman aged 43 yeares
[WWW]John Thistlethwaite of Portsmouth gentleman aged 37 yeeres
[WWW]Thomas Garret of Redriffe Shipwright late Carpenter of the Ship ”Anne”, (John Adkins late Master) aged 20 yeeres
[WWW]John Mente of Saint Catherines neere the Tower of London Chirurgion aged 23 yeeres
[WWW]Gerbrand Sas Doctor of Lawes
[WWW]Francisco de Moralis of Saint Lucars de Baramuda in Andalusia Captaine of the shipp the ”Pea henn” belonging to Saint Lucars aforesaud, aged 30 yeeres


 ff.480r-489v

[WWW]Andries Verhoogh in Zeeland Mariner, aged 37 yeeres
[WWW]Diego de Guevara of Sivile in Andalusia Master or Sopracargo of the said shipp the ”Peahen”, aged 34 yeeres
[WWW]Lewis Francis of Calice in ffrance Merchant, aged 49 yeeres
[WWW]Pedro Michel of Marseilla in ffrance Mariner, aged 32 yeares
[WWW]James Ru(?p)eleau ofM(?orenar) in (XXXX) in the Realme of ffrance Mariner, aged 41 yeeres
[WWW]John Erable of Mornar neere Rochell in the Realme of ffrance Mariner, aged 35 yeeres
[WWW]John Burnelau of Mornau in the Realme of ffrance Sailor, aged 28 yeeres
[WWW]John (?S)ooker of the Parish of Saint (?Buttolphs) Bishopsgate London Mariner Master of the ship ”Richard and Martyn”, aged 52 yeeres
[WWW]Phillip Widdoson of the parish of Saint Olaves in Southwarke yeoman aged 37 yeeres
[WWW]John (?Porolim) of Shadwell in the parish of Stepney in the County of Middlesex Mariner aged 29 yeeres
[WWW]John Frost of New England mariner but belonging at present to the ship the ”Exchange” of London (John Peirce master) aged 22 yeeres


 ff.490r-499v

[WWW]John Clarke of New England Mariner but at Present belonging to the ship the ”Exchange” of London (John Peirce Master) aged 19 yeeres
[WWW]Richard Taylor of Saint Katherines Mariner, aged 20 yeeres
[WWW]Thomas More of Horsey downe in the County of Surry Shipwright, aged 25 yeeres
[WWW]Abraham Ripley Chirurgeon resident at present in the parish of Saint Michaell Woodstreete London, and borne in or neere the same parish, aged 33 yeeres
[WWW]John Duce of Wapping in the County of Middlesex Mariner aged 36 yeeres
[WWW]John Hunter native of Eddenborough Scotland but residing at Present at the signe of the Ball in Saint Lawrence Pountneys Lane London Merchant aged 48 yeeres
[WWW]John Taylor of Limehouse Marriner late Boatswaine of the ship the ”hopewell” Arthur Perkins Master aged about 35 yeeres


 ff.500r-509v

[WWW]Godfrey Hembling of Waborne in (?Clay) in Norfolke aged 40 yeeres
[WWW]Morris Briggs of Saint Katherines waterman aged 58 yeeres
[WWW]Abraham Barnaby Citizen and (?Grocer) of London Living at the Tower Liberty aged 32 yeers
[WWW]The Answer of the foresaid Godfrey Hembling to the Interrogatories
[WWW]The answer of the said Morris Briggs To the Interrogatories
[WWW]Captaine Thomas Sprittiman Native of Peterhead in the County of (?BoughXX) in Scotland Mariner, late Master of the ship the ”Golden Starre”, aged 37 yeeres
[WWW]Cornelius De Gelder of London Merchant aged 38 yeeres
[WWW]Henry hart of ffalkirke neere Glascoe in Scotland Mariner aged 30 yeeres
[WWW]Henry hart of ffalkirke (?neere ?Glascoe) in Scotland Mariner aged 30 yeeres
[WWW]Captaine Nathaniel Cobham of dunkirke Commander of a foote Company there, aged 40 yeeres
[WWW]Richard Shament Living in Grubstreete London Chirurgion aged 23 yeeres


 ff.510r-519v

[WWW]Alexander Kerr native of Greenock in Scotland but living at Ayre in Scotland Mariner aged about thirty yeeres
[WWW]Alexander Keir of Borrowstonesse neere (?Aenborow) in Scotland Mariner aged about 19 yeeres
[WWW]Alexander Keir of Burroghston neere Edenborowe in Scotland Mariner aged about 19 yeeres
[WWW]James Ker of Glascoe in Scotland Merchant aged 22 yeeres
[WWW]Robert Cuming of Glascoe in Scotland Merchant aged 34 yeeres and upwards
[WWW]Edward Paine of Saint Ives in Cornwall gentleman aged 31 yeeres
[WWW]Collaert Budaert of Calice in ffrance mariner late Master of the ship the ”Saint Lewis” aged 50 yeeres
[WWW]Phillip Mansell of Swanzey Merchant aged 30 yeeres


ff.520r-529v

[WWW]Christianus Tepffer Native of (?GXXX) but lodging at Present in New Gravell Lane in Wapping Mariner aged 32 yeeres
[WWW]Laurence Tyrer of Liverpool in Lancashire Mariner aged 25 yeeres
[WWW]Captaine Owen Sallevanne of Munster in Ireland, Gentleman aged 26 yeeres
[WWW]Colonel Edward Freeman Governour of Tinby Castle in the County of Pembro(?ke) in Southwales aged about 49 yeeres
[WWW]Garret Johnson Conneke of (XXXX) in north Holland mariner aged 35 yeares
[WWW]Jacob van Wallendal dwelling at Rochell Marchant aged 35 yeeres
[WWW]Daniel van Liebergen of Rochell but borne at Amsterdam aged 26 yeeres
[WWW]William Jackson servant to Thomas Burton of London Merchant, aged (XX) yeeres
[WWW]John Bell of Lower Shadwell in the parish of Stepney and County of Middlesex Smith aged 36 yeeres


 ff.530r-539v

[WWW]James Do(?w)glas of Allhallowes Barking London Skinner aged 30 yeeres
[WWW]Thomas Greeneleafe of BeereLane London wine Cooper aged 22 yeeres

 

 

ML wltm Arch for marine conversations

The MarineLives project was launched in September 2012 by a group of public and academic historians. Since its inception, project volunteers have transcribed over 1.5 million words from the Admiralty Court records, 1650-1669, and are making these available to the public. Click here for to see searchable transciptions from the years 1657-1658.

We are expanding our activities in this coming year and have begun collaborations with early modernists at Bath Spa university, and with the informatics departments of the universities of Mannheim and Ancona.

The MarineLives team is now looking for an academic archaeologist with whom to discuss a number of topics, and with whom we might collaborate on one or more journal articles. Topics include:

* Warehouses, cranes and other Thames waterfront infrastructure used in goods storage and handling

– Comparing the textual record we are developing with archaeological evidence

– Examining the economics and operational characteristics of storage and goods handling

* Thames docks, wharves, stairs, and chains used for mooring, and for loading, unloading and bulk breaking

– Comparing the textual record we are developing with archaeological evidence

– Developing a better understanding of the use and specialisation of shore infrastructure, e.g. Blackwall, St Katherine’s dock

Click here for sample textual material on docks, wharves and stairs

* Ships, ketches, and barges

– We are building a large relational database of vessels of different type, coded by tonnage, manning levels, and routes.

– For a portion of these vessels we have the place and year of building, a description of hull type, a description of rigging and masts, and an understanding of the range of goods they carried, together with associated freight charges, manning levels, and victualling costs.  For a portion of these vessels we have detailed inventories breaking down the building costs or assessed market value of the ship, the rigging, the masts, and iron work

– We would like to link some of this textual and economic data to the physical record, and to explore specific trades and yards supporting the building, maintenance and supplying of ships, such as mast yards, timber yards, and anchor smiths.

Click here for a description of an anchor smith’s Thameside yard

* Cargo storage on board ship and cargo economics

– We are developing a reasonably detailed understanding from textual sources of goods handling and storage on board ship, and are seeking to deepen our understanding of operational parameters and metrics.

– For example, the man power required to load cotton at Cyprus into ships of different sizes, specialist stevadores and common seamen, and how speed of loading could affect the efficiency of stowing goods (and thus freight capacity and freight earning power). Click here for textual samples on steeving of Cyprus cotton wool

– For example, the handling and transportation of animals, such as horses, from Norway to the Barbados, including the use of temporary pens and on board hoists

If any of the above is of interest to you, please get in touch.  If you know someone who might be interested, please send them a link to this article

What’s in a name?

Today’s Shipping News blog article is the second in a series of user perspectives on social tagging systems. The first in the series – User perspective on social tagging – was published on July 18th, 2013.

We continue to experiment with probabilistic tags using the current version of the National Archives social tagging system, and are entering a new series of tags grouped under the new heading of MaterialLIves.  These complement our MarineLives series of National Archives social tags.

The data are derived from a material history proof of concept we ran early last year, and which we hope in the future to develop as a collaboration between public and academic historians.

The data

MaterialLives tags probate inventories, probate accounts, and other probate litigation held at the National Archives and links it to Prerogative Court of Canterbury wills. The data are for the period 1660 to 1689 and have been further linked to London, Middlesex, Kent and Surrey hearth tax data from the early and mid 1660s.

The current data set consists of two parts. 

Part One:  Ninety PROB 4 and twenty seven PROB 5 inventories from the 1660s to the 1680s, which have been probabilistically linked to probate wills.

Part Two: One hundred and twenty three London, Middlesex, Surrey and Kent inventories from the 1660s to the 1680s (mainly PROB 4 and PROB 5), which have been probabilistically linked to London, Middlesex, Surrey and Kent hearth tax data.

Sample tags

We have started to enter MaterialLIves data into the National Archives tagging system, and would appreciate feedback from our readers, especially from material and social historians, who might wish to work with us to expand the data set and to use the material in peer reviewed publications.

To date we have been tagging probabilistic links for will and inventory data using the National Archives social tagging system. But we are investigating how best to capture probabilistic links between these data and hearth tax data. Ideally, a direct link would be possible from the MarineLives National Archives tags to the electronic publication of various hearth tax data sets.

London and Middlesex:  British History Online, Returns collected by AHRC Hearth Tax Project, 2007-2010

Kent: Kent Hearth Tax Assessment Lady Day 1664: CKS: Q/RTh Transcribed and computerised by Duncan Harrington

Surrey: Surrey hearth Tax transcript, Lady Day, 1664

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Zealous National Archives profanity checking

Readers with refined sensibilities should read further at their own risk.

An attempt to link the Will of Nathaniel Cock, Merchant of Saint Mary Woolnoth, City of London to two related inventory parts accepted the tag MaterialLives, but balked at his name.

Tables of probate inventories by hearth tax size and by occupation and hearth tax size

Data and sample inventory transcriptions can be viewed here.

Hearth tax to will (and inventory) linkage can be viewed here

Cannibal tales

The humple petition of Priscilla Lockier and Sara Spurgeon wifes of Hugh Lockier and George Spurgeon two of the Marriners of the Shipp the Virginia Merchant (whereof John Lockier was Captaine or Commander) is a curious document.1

Written in the formal legal prose of a London solicitor, it is a direct appeal to the justices of the Admiralty Court for the immediate payment of mariners wages. Henry Lockier and George Spurgeon, the womens’ husbands,  had not yet returned from Virginia, whence they shipped in September 1649 from London, and their wives, “having each of them a great Charge of Children to  bring up and maintaine,” were at risk of utter ruin.

At first reading the claims of the two women seem remarkable.

A captain who took on one hundred and sixty passengers in addition to thirty-five crewmen, yet who carried victuals for only six weeks, rather than the usual three months. Men and women consequently suffering famine on board ship, and reduced to paying ten shillings to purchase a single ship’s rat to eat.

Twenty-three men and women abandoned on an island by an inhumane and barbarous Captain, surviving on rain water and tree leaves, till eventually they were reduced to drawing lots as to who should be shot the next day “to serve food for the rest.” 2

The intervention of God causing the “sudden and unexpected fall of a great tree that night which killed two men and a woman of their Company: which the rest of the Company left alive were forced to eate and live upon untill such time as they were by Gods providence releived by the very heathen and by them in Canoes transported over the river to the other side and soe travelled to Virginia by land.” 3


Fanciful tales, or a dramatic statement of facts? 

Unusually for a High Court of Admiralty case, there is an independent account from outside the court, of the voyage of the Virginia Merchant.  The account was written by Colonel Henry Norwood (1615-1689), a passenger on board the same ship, and published shortly after the voyage as ‘A voyage to Virginia.’ 4

Norwood’s account corroborates the broad claims of the petition of Priscilla Lockier and Sara Spurgeon.

Badly damaged by storms, it is clear that famine and death descended upon the ship.  Rations were reduced to half a biscuit per man and woman per day and “the famine grew sharp upon us.5

Norwood even out trumps the petitioners story of the ten shilling rats:

“Women and children made dismal cries and grievous complaints. The infinite number of rats that all the voyage had been our plague, we now were glad to make our prey to feed on; and as they were insnared and taken, a well grown rat was sold for sixteen shillings as a market rate. Nay, before the voyage did end (as I was credibly inform’d) a woman great with child offered twenty shillings for a rat, which the proprietor refusing, the woman died.” 6

Norwood describes a weak Captain, who has become a pawn to the weather and who has lost full control of his crew and despairing passengers. After a meagre Christmas feast, the captain extended Norwood the favour of going in search of water at the bottoms of the empty casks in the hold. Sitting astride on a butt of Malaga in the hold, they took to drinking of the strong waters. The effect on Norwood was to refresh him, yet the captain fell, according to Norwood, into melancholy:

“The poor captain fell to contemplate (as it better became him) our sad condition; and being troubled in mind for having brought so many wretched souls into misery, by a false confidence he gave them of his having a good ship, which he now thought would prove their ruin; and being conscious, that their loss would lie all at his door, it was no easy matter to appease his troubled thoughts. He made me a particular compliment for having engaged me and my friends in the same bottom, and upon that burst into tears. I comforted him the best I could, and told him, We must all submit to the hand of God, and rely on his goodness, hoping, that the same providence which had hitherto so miraculously preserved us, would still be continued in our favour till we were in safety. We retired obscurely to our friends, who had been wondering at our absence.” 7


What of the cannibalism?

Norwood was one the men and women left on an island off the Virginian coast by the Virginia Merchant.

He estimates their number to have been nineteen, rather than the twenty-three of the petition, and describes a meagre diet of an occasional water-fowl, oysters clawed from the shore, supplemented with some sort of weed “some four inches long, as thick as houseleek, and the only green (except pines) that the island afforded. It was very insipid on the palate; but being boiled with a little pepper (of which one had brought a pound on shore) and helped with five or six oysters, it became a regale for every one in turn.” 8

Norwood confirms the eating of human flesh by the survivors, but without the drama of Lockier and Spurgeon’s description of lots being drawn to shoot a colleague for flesh to eat. Indeed, Norwood claims the idea to have been his own firm recommendation to the group.  With an etiquette which may intrigue historians of gender, the women and the men were each to eat their own.

Of the three weak women before-mentioned, one had the envied happiness to die about this time; and it was my advice to the survivors, who were following her apace, to endeavour their own preservation by converting, her dead carcase into food, as they did to good effect. The same counsel was embrac’d by those of our sex: the living fed upon the dead; four of our company having the happiness to end their miserable lives on Sunday night the _ day of January. Their chief distemper, ’tis true, was hunger; but it pleased God to hasten their exit by an immoderate access of cold, caused by a most terrible storm of hail and snow at north-west, on the Sunday aforesaid, which did not only dispatch those four to their long homes, but did sorely threaten all that remained alive, to perish by the same fate. 9


Click here to go to an annotated copy of the petition of Priscilla Lockier and Sara Spurgeon, together with Colonel Henry Norwood’s account of the voyage of the Virginia Merchant and of cannibalism.  Follow the instructions to register and to add your own annotations.


The petition of Prescilla Lockier and Sara Spurgeon, 28th September 1650 10

To the right worshipfull the Judges of the high Court of the Admiraltie:./

The humple petition of Priscilla Lockier and Sara Spurgion wifes of Hugh Lockier and George Spurgeon two of the Marriners of the Shipp the Virginia Merchant (whereof John Lockier was Captaine or Comander./

Sheweth
That the petitioners husbands were hired by the said Captaine Lockier at severall monethly wages to serve in the said shipp for a voyage to be made from this port of London to Virginia and from thense hither backe againe, which service they performed from the 6th of September 1649 untill March last being 6 monethes lacking 4 dayes, but by reason the sayd Shipp was become unserviceable at Virginia your petitioners husbands could not come home in her but are left behind to shift for themselves the said Captaine Lockier and some others coming home as passengers in another Shippe And your petitioners seeing their husbands come not home as they expected demanded their wages of the Captaine for the time they served him, but he denyed to pay the same, for which your petitioners have sued the said Captaine Lockier in the Court And whereas all Masters of Shipps that goe to Virginia use to carry 3 monethes ˹victualls˺ at the least out with them; The sayd Captaine Lockier had not layd in above 6 weekes victualls in his said shipp when she sett saile from Gravesend outward bound; which Mr George Putt cheife Mate and pilot of the said Shippe taking notice of, asked the said Captaine why he had soe slenderly victualled the shipp telling him, it would not serve halfe way; he replyed that he would take in more victualls at the Downes which he did not at all performe notwithstanding there were 35 seaman and above 130 passengers neere upon 200 persons in all in the said Shippe, whereof 62 passengers and 4 Seamen by reason of the want of provisions were starved to death before the shipp came to Virginia.

That within a fortnight next after the said Ship set saile from Gravesend both Seamen and passingers were put to their allowance videlicet the Seamen to two, and the passingers each man to one biskett a day, afterwards to halfe a biskett a day and at length to halfe a pint of parched pease a day betweene 2 men, they having neither beere nor water in the shippe to drincke but what they were Constrayned to drinke of strongwaters of their owne which they Carried with them for adventures: and the famine came soe violently upon them that divers in the said Shippe would willingly have given 10: s for one of the Shipps ratts (which some of the Seamen catched) to have eaten, their being but one small fish of the value of 6: d allowed for a meale to 15 or 20 men:/

That the said Captaine Lockier sett 23 persons ashore upon an unknowne Island to gett freshwater promising to fetch them on board againe: but after they were soe sett on shoare the sayd Captaine Lockier presently carried the Shippe away to Virginia and most in humanely and barbarously left all the said 23 persons in that unknowne place to be starved there noe manner of food to be found soe that they were forced to live a whole 3 weekes with water and the leaves of trees: And at the length the rage and violence of their famine soe much increasing and being not able to eate those leaves and longer they cast lotts which of them should be shott the next day to serve for food for the rest; which was miraculously prevented by the suddaine and unexpected fall of a great tree that night which killed 2 men and a woman of their Company: which the rest of the Company left alive were forced to eate and live upon untill such time as they were by Gods providence XXXXXXXX releived by the very heathen and by them in Canoes transported over the river to the other side and soe travelled to Virginia by land where divers of them dyed as soone as they came thense, and some dyed on that Island by famine./

That the petitioners have spent all they have even their very {XXXX} from under them in prosecution of this suite to gett their wages and are like to be utterly ruined and undone they having each of them a great Charge of Children to bring up and maintaine all which premisses your petitioners are able to prove by the oathes of sufficient witnesses

Your petitioners therefore most humbly pray that your worships would be pleased to take their sad conditions into their your pious and serious Considerations, and to order the sayd Captaine Lockier to pay your petitioners their whole wages due to their husbands forthwith or els to give your petitioners leave to give in an allegation in Court to the effect of the premisses above written: the same being altogether omitted in the allegation given in on your petitioners behalfe; and to produce and examine witnesses thereupon, that soe the iustice of your petitioners Cause and the great wrong they have received may appeare;

And your petitioners as in humble duty
bound shall ever pray etcetera

The marke of P L Prescillia Lockier
The marke of S Sara Sparges./


Footnotes

(1) TNA, HCA 15/5 f.99
(2) TNA, HCA 15/5 f.99
(3) TNA, HCA 15/5 f.99
(4) Colonel Norwood, A Voyage to Virginia (1649), in Tracts and Other Paper Relating Principally to the Origin, Settlement, and Progress of the Colonies in North America From the Discovery of the Country to the Year 1776, vol. 3 (Gloucester, MA, 1963)
(5) Colonel Norwood, A Voyage to Virginia (1649), in Tracts and Other Paper Relating Principally to the Origin, Settlement, and Progress of the Colonies in North America From the Discovery of the Country to the Year 1776, vol. 3 (Gloucester, MA, 1963), p. 17)
(6) Colonel Norwood, A Voyage to Virginia (1649), in Tracts and Other Paper Relating Principally to the Origin, Settlement, and Progress of the Colonies in North America From the Discovery of the Country to the Year 1776, vol. 3 (Gloucester, MA, 1963), p. 17)
(7) Colonel Norwood, A Voyage to Virginia (1649), in Tracts and Other Paper Relating Principally to the Origin, Settlement, and Progress of the Colonies in North America From the Discovery of the Country to the Year 1776, vol. 3 (Gloucester, MA, 1963), p. 18)
(8) Colonel Norwood, A Voyage to Virginia (1649), in Tracts and Other Paper Relating Principally to the Origin, Settlement, and Progress of the Colonies in North America From the Discovery of the Country to the Year 1776, vol. 3 (Gloucester, MA, 1963), pp. 23-24)
(9) Colonel Norwood, A Voyage to Virginia (1649), in Tracts and Other Paper Relating Principally to the Origin, Settlement, and Progress of the Colonies in North America From the Discovery of the Country to the Year 1776, vol. 3 (Gloucester, MA, 1963), pp. 24-25)
(10) TNA, HCA 15/5 f.99

 

Witnesses in Court, 1657-1658

Witnesses deposed in the English Admiralty Court vary greatly in age, occupation and statehood.  The MarineLives annotation project, which kicks off in July, will explore and annotate the lives of roughly two hundred such men and women from the years 1657 and 1658 (HCA 13/72).

The Court’s records provide the testimony of common seamen, shipwrights, and brewers’ clerks, as well as the words of merchants and ship captains.  They document litigation by seamens’ widows to recover their deceased husband’s wages, and the commercial battles of women continuing their husband’s marine supply businesses, long after their husband’s deaths.

The records

Take a look at some of the witness statements by clicking on the links below.

You can search the records for topics of interest using the search box in the top right hand corner of every Annotate HCA 13/72 wiki page.

Each wiki page provides a transcription, together with the opportunity to add notes on people, places, ships, materials and miscellaneous, and to suggest relevant primary and secondary sources.

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Extract: Alphabetical index of deponents in the High Court of Admiralty, 1656-58


A

[WWW]Haniball Allen of London Merchant aged thirty two yeares
[WWW]Manoel Alverez of the New Market neere Covent Garden Steward of the Portugal Ambassadour, aged 36 yeares


B

[WWW]John Barnett of Ratcliff in the parish of Stepney and County of Middlesex Mariner Steward of the shipp Elizabeth and Mary aged sixtie yeares
[WWW]Thomas Barnes of Ratcliff Mariner aged twenty six yeares
[WWW]Adrian Bastianson of Schernmer Horne neere Amsterdam Mariner one of the company of the said shipp Morning Starr aged 25 yeares
[WWW]Leonard Bates of the parish of Saint Michael Cornehill London Scrivener, aged 34 yeares
[WWW]Marke Bennett of Greenwich in the County of Kent Mariner, aged about 25 yeares
[WWW]Henry Berry of Redriff in the County of Surrey Shipwright, aged 28 yeeres
[WWW]Richard Beswick of Hull mariner, aged 27 yeares
[WWW]Jonathan Bigland of Redriff Shipwright, aged 28 yeares
[WWW]Charles Bradick Master of the Maidstone frigot aged 53 yeeres
[WWW]Thomas Browning of Wapping Mariner, aged 35 yeares
[WWW]John Bryson of the parish of Saint Katherines Coleman in ffanchurch streete London Merchant aged 24 yeeres
[WWW]Edward Buckley of the parish of Saint Olave in Southwarke Mariner aged twenty nyne yeares
[WWW]John Bushell of the parish of Saint Andrew Undershaft London Merchant aged 39. yeares


C

[WWW]Henry Carter servant and Apprentice to Richard Brian of the parish of Saint Mary at hill London Wine Cooper aged 20 yeares
[WWW]Samuell Church of Writtle in Essex Mariner aged twenty sixe yeares
[WWW]ffrederick Claeson of Amsterdam mariner, boatswaine of the said shipp the Morning starr aged 30 yeeres
[WWW]Abraham Clarke of Debtford in Kent shipwright Carpenter of the shipp Unitie the voyage in question aged twenty five yeare
[WWW]Thomas Clarke of Redriff in the County of Surrie Mariner, aged 42 yeeres
[WWW]John Cobb of Rederiffe in the County of Surry Mate in the shipp the Gilbert
[WWW]Thomas Constant of the parish of Saint Nicholas in the Citty of Bristoll Mariner, aged about 25 yeares
[WWW]John Cooke of the parish of White Chappell London Merchant, aged 36 yeeres
[WWW]Stephen Cranbrooke of Deale in the County of Kent Mariner aged 36 yeares


D

[WWW]John Daniel of the citie of London Notary publique aged fourtie yeeres
[WWW]Anthony Deane of Greenwich Shipwright aged 25 yeeres
[WWW]Israel Dennis of Bristol Mariner late masters mate of the shipp the Recovery of Bristoll, aged 33 yeeres
[WWW]Bertrand diX Dibarbore of London Merchant aged nine and twenty yeares
[WWW]Bertrand dibarbore of London Merchant aged 29 yeeres
[WWW]Bertrand Dibarbone of London Merchant aged nine and twenty yeares
[WWW]Francis Dickinson of Horsedowne in the parish of Saint Olaves Southwarke Mariner aged 25 yeares


E

[WWW]Daniel Edwards of London Merchant, aged 42 yeeres


F

[WWW]John ffenner of the parish of White Chappell Turner aged 30 yeeres
[WWW]Nicholas de Ferrari of London Merchant aged 56. yeares
[WWW]Richard fford of London Marchant aged 43 yeeres


G

[WWW]George Gosyde of Amsterdam Mariner, aged 30 yeares
[WWW]Thomas Gowen of Disert in Scotland Mariner aged thirty yeares
[WWW]Thomas Grant of London Mariner aged fifty yeares
[WWW]Thomas Gray of Wapping Boat=swaine of the shipp the Golden ffleece, being produced by Captaine Seaman Captaine of the said Golden ffleece,


H

[WWW]Haie Haies of Marquera in ffreezland Mariner, Schipper of the shipp the Sampson of London, aged 26 yeares
[WWW]Thomas Hanson of the same Mariner, Stiersman of the same vessell aged 24 yeares or thereabouts
[WWW]John Harris of Rie in the County of Sussex Mariner, aged 60 yeeres
[WWW]John Harris of Wapping in the County of Middlesex mariner late Boatswaine of the Christopher the voyage in question aged thirty one yeares
[WWW]William Harris servant of Mr Monger Water Bayliff of the citie of London, aged 48 yeeres
[WWW]Robert Hartley of Bright Hamson in the County of Sussex Mariner, aged 31 yeares
[WWW]Samuell Haughton of the parish of Allhallowes Lombarde streete London Scriverner. aged twenty one yeares
[WWW]Paul Heyn of Christiansand in Norway Mariner Master of the shipp called the Little Lyon now of London, aged 43 yeares
[WWW]Thomas Hicks of London ffishmonger, aged 39 yeeres
[WWW]John Humphreys of Bright Hampson in the County of Sussex Mariner, aged 27 yeares
[WWW]John Hunt of Colchester, Mariner, a foremast man of the Ketch the Bachelor, aged 21: yeeres
[WWW]Richard Hussy of Lymehouse in the parish of Stepney Mariner late Master of the Saint Lucar Marchant aged sixty yeares
[WWW]Robert Hyde of Rederith in the County of Surry Marriner aged 23 yeeres


I

[WWW]Esiah Isbell now of Wapping but late of Kerrey in Ireland Mariner aged 30 yeares
[WWW]Frederick Ixem of London Notary publique


J

[WWW]John Johnson of Madenblick in holland Mariner aged 24 yeares
[WWW]Thomas Johnson of Rotterdam Mariner, aged 40 yeeres
[WWW]Robert Jones of the parish of Saint Mary Maldalen in Surry Marriner, Master of the ship Providence aged 40 yeeres


K

[WWW]Richard Keate of the parish of Saint Mary Overy in Southwarke Mariner aged twenty one yeares
[WWW]Henry Kyne of Wapping in the parishe of Stepney and County of Middlesex Mariner aged nynteene yeares


L

[WWW]William Lee of London Merchant aged 28 yeeres
[WWW]Luke Lilly now of the parish of Saint Austin by Pauls London gentleman late Passenger in the shipp the Gilbert from the Barbados (whereof the sayd William Croford was Master)
[WWW]Abraham da Lima of London Merchant servant of the producent Isaac da Andrada Andrada, aged 24 yeeres
[WWW]Nicholas Lorson of Timsborough in Norway Marchant aged 31 yeeres


M

[WWW]Edward Makkettuer of Wapping in the parish of Stepney Lighterman aged fifty three yeares
[WWW]Henry Man of Enchusen in holland Mariner Carpenter mate of the Negro the voyage in question aged thirty one yeares
[WWW]Baldwin Mathewes of Middleborowe Merchant aged 37 yeares
[WWW]John Maxfeild of the parish of Saint Edmunds the Kinge and Martyr in Lombard Streete London Scrivener aged twenty seaven yeares
[WWW]Richard Megin of Ratcliff in the parish of Stepney Mariner aged thirty two yeares
[WWW]Antonio Martinis da Mesa of Sevile Merchant aged thirtie two
[WWW]Thomas Middleton of Poplar in the parish of Stepney and county of Middlesex Esquire aged 48 yeeres
[WWW]John Moore of the parish of Saint Mary Magdalen Bermondsea Mariner, aged 32 yeares
[WWW]Thomas Morgan of Rederiff in the County of Surrey Mariner Boatswaine of the sayd Shipp the Negro the voyage in question aged thirty fower yeares
[WWW]Richard Morris late of the Barbadoes and now of London Chirurgion aged thirty eight
[WWW]Henry Mudde of Wapping in the parish of Stepney and County of Middlesex Mariner Masters Mate of the Welcombe aged twenty two yeares
[WWW]Captaine Christofer Myngs commander of the Marston Moore frigot in the immediate service of this Commonwealth, aged 32 yeeres


N

[WWW]Thomas Norton of London Packer, aged 37 yeares
[WWW]James Nuthall of the precinct of Saint Katherine neere the Tower of London gentleman aged thirty two yeares


O

[WWW]John Orton of Wapping Wall, Cooke, aged fourtie two yeares


P

[WWW]Mathew Paine of Wapping in the County of Middlesex Mariner, late master of the shipp the Martin ffrigot of Waterford, aged 29 yeeres
[WWW]Francis Pardini of London Merchant aged 36. yeares
[WWW]John Peterson of Amsterdám Marriner Stiersman of the shipp the Morning Starr, aged 27 yeeres
[WWW]John Peterson of the citie of Bristoll Merchant aged 43 yeares
[WWW]Edward Phillips of Debtford Sailer, one of the Company of the Maidstone frigot in the immediate service of this Commonwealth, aged 24 yeeres
[WWW]Hugh Powell of Dukes Place London Merchant aged 49 yeares
[WWW]George Prince of London Merchant Mariner, aged 30 yeeres
[WWW]Peter Proby
[WWW]John Pryenaer of Ostend Mariner aged 44 yeares
[WWW]Charles Pullen of East Cowes in the Ile of Wight Marriner, aged 34 yeeres


Q


R

[WWW]Robert Richbell of Southampton Merchant aged fifty yeeres
[WWW]William Ricks of Shadwell in the parish of Stepney aged about 40ty yeeres
[WWW]Francis Robinson of the parish of Saint Buttolph without Bishopsgate London Merchant, aged 36 yeares
[WWW]Richard Roch of the parish of Saint Trinitie in the Minories London citizen and Merchant tailor of London, aged 60 yeeres
[WWW]Richard Rudstone of Colchester in the County of Essex Mariner Master of the ship Bachelor aged 30 yeeres
[WWW]Edward Ryder of Shadwell in the parish if Stepney and County of Middlesex Long Cutler aged thirty one yeares


S

[WWW]Nicholas Saunders of Truroe in Cornewall Merchant, aged 28 yeeres
[WWW]Rowland Serchfeild of London Merchant
[WWW]Peter Silvester of London Merchant, aged 27 yeeres
[WWW]Thomas Sinnet of the parish of Saint Buttolphs Algate Mariner, aged 40 yeares
[WWW]Peter Smith of BrightHampton in the County of Sussex Sailor, aged 23 yeeres
[WWW]George Steward now of Shadwell but late of Invernesse in Scotland Mariner and Carpenter of the Elizabeth and Mary
[WWW]Cuthbert Stone of Powderam neere Exeter in the County of devon Mariner Gunner of the Elizabeth and Mary aged thirty eight yeares


T

[WWW]Thomas Thompson of Wapping Mariner, aged 35 yeeres
[WWW]Albert Tompson of Delft haven mariner, aged 23 yeeres


U


V

[WWW]William Venus of the parish of Saint Mary Magdalen Bermondsea Shipwright, aged 42 yeeres
[WWW]Samuel Vernon of the same citite Merchant aged 44 yeeres


W

[WWW]George Webber of London Merchant, áged 29 yeeres
[WWW]John Weekes of the same citie servant of Laurence Martel of the citie afore said Merchant aged twenty yeeres
[WWW]George Whillers of Lisbone Merchant, aged about 28 yeeres
[WWW]George Whitlers of Lisbone Merchant aged 28 yeeres
[WWW]Richard Wilde of London merchant, aged 19 yeeres
[WWW]George Wilkinson of Ipswich in Suffolk Marriner late fforemast man of the said ship King David aged 18 yeeres
[WWW]Claes Williams of Amsterdam master of the said shipp Morningstarr, aged 38 yeares
[WWW]Claes Williams of Amsterdám mariner, aged 38 yeeres
[WWW]John Wills of Ratcliff in the parish of Stepney and County of Middlesex Mariner Captaine of the Successe of London aged fifty two yeares
[WWW]Henry Wilson of Greenwich labourer, aged 40 yeeres
[WWW]Captaine Isaac Woodgreene of Wapping Mariner aged 40 yeares
[WWW]Rogert Worthley of XXell in Norfolke Mariner Gunners mate of the Negro the voyage in question aged forty five yeares


X


Y


Z